Farm Monitor – June 30, 2018

Farm Monitor – June 30, 2018


[Announcer]
This is the Georgia Farm Monitor. Since 1966, your source for state and national
agribusiness news and features for farmers and consumers about Georgia’s number one
industry, agriculture. The Georgia Farm Monitor is produced by the
state’s largest general farm organization, the Georgia Farm Bureau. Now, here are your hosts, Ray D’Alessio
and Kenny Burgamy. [RAY]
AND YES WE WELCOME YOU TO THE FARM MONITOR. SO GLAD YOU TUNED IN. WE ARE YOUR HOSTS FOR THE NEXT 30 MINUTES. RAY D’ALESSIO. [KENNY]
AND I’M KENNY BURGAMY. HONESTLY THOUGH, 30 MINUTES IS NOT ENOUGH
TO COVER EVERYTHING WE HAVE FOR YOU TODAY, BUT WE PLAN TO GET IT IN. STRAIGHT AHEAD ON THE SHOW… WHY GEORGIA COULD BE A MAJOR PLAYER IN THE
CITRUS INDUSTRY, SOONER RATHER THAN LATER. ALSO ON THE PROGRAM, EVER HEARD OF PEACH SHRIMP
KABOBS? WELL, THERE’S ONE OF THE RECIPES IN THIS
MONTH’S MEALS FROM THE FIELD AND TRUST ME FOLKS, RAY SAYS THEY ARE GOOD. [RAY]
YES, THEY ARE! AND THEN LATER. WHAT’S OLD IS NEW AGAIN AND THIS AGING, ONCE
VIBRANT 4-H CENTER IS BEING RESTORED BACK TO ITS GLORY DAYS THANKS TO AN INITIATIVE
BY FULTON COUNTY 4-H AND UGA EXTENSION. THESE STORIES AND SO MUCH MORE STARTING RIGHT
NOW ON THE FARM MONITOR. [KENNY]
With temperatures on the rise, so are the amount of people looking to improve their
lawn. That’s where local nurseries can be helpful
as they provide not just the plants, but expert advice as well. Damon Jones takes a look at a new operation
that’s already making a name for itself. [Damon Jones – Reporting]
It’s officially summertime, which means plants will be flying off the shelf as home owners
look to get their yard ready for parties and get togethers. It’s a market that has been underserved around
Hall County, which is why one local horticulturalist has decided to open his own shop. [Nathan Wilson – Lanier Nursery and Gardens]
It’s very important because I literally grew up five, lived and grew up about five minutes
down the street. And so, I knew the area. We knew what was lacking. And a nursery has been lacking in this particular
side of the county for a very long time. [Damon]
But that is no longer the case, as Lanier Nursery and Gardens hope to offer a one stop
shop for gardening enthusiasts around the area. As for what they can expect to find… [Nathan]
Pretty much everything, we’ve got a great amount of diversity and variety to see. We have trees. We have shrubs. We have perennials. We have annuals. We have vegetable plants. And the great thing is that all of our plants,
we work with local growers. So, they’re Georgia Grown plants and they
are supporting folks just like ourselves who are working in horticulture, growing plants
and trying to help people. [Damon]
One of this nursery’s specialties is providing plants that are native to the area, as they
are more likely to draw birds and other animals into your yard. [Nathan]
Native plants are great because you are able to provide for wildlife, if you want pollinators,
if you want food for the birds. And also, being here close to Lake Lanier,
there are only a certain number of plants that have to be native of course. Natives are going to attract more wildlife. Natives are going to provide real food for
pollinators. [Damon]
While people might think getting their plants from big box stores is more convenient, they
can’t come close to offering the same selection that a local nursery can. [Nathan]
You know, you go in and you find a large group of plants, but it’s all the same thing. Well here, we have large groups of plants
but they’re split up into small sections of different colors, different shapes, different
textures, different forms. And the main reason we want to do this is
primarily because we are not all the same. You know, your neighbor’s lawn and your lawn,
they need to look a little different because your different. [Damon]
And it’s not just the wide variety of plants and trees that make visiting a nursery worth
the effort, but also the advice these experts can offer to increase your chances of success. [Nathan]
What we want to do is provide information. We want to provide the knowledge, the experience
to help you be successful in your landscape. They’ll give you a plant and you take it and
it dies. Then you have to redo it. We want to give you the information on top
of the plant so that when you go, you feel confident before you even put the shovel in
the ground. [Damon]
As for advice for people looking to start up their own garden, Wilson says the biggest
thing is to have a plan in place before starting. [Nathan]
So, you’ve got to pick what you like first because you’ve got to be happy with it. Secondly, I would say pick your priorities. Do we want to work on the garden in the front
first or do we want to work on the garden in the back first, the sides? What’s our most important thing, curb appeal
or privacy in the back for a little oasis that we can go eat or entertain at? So, pick your priorities as well. [Damon]
Reporting from Gainesville, I’m Damon Jones for the Farm Monitor. [RAY]
Damon, thank you so much. On to other ag news now. Experts say it’s not a matter of if but when
will Georgia become the next big producer in citrus. According to the Georgia Citrus Association,
Florida has lost 70 percent of their goods to diseases, which means Georgia could potentially
become the leaders in the country for citrus crops like navel oranges, limes and grapefruit. The GCA is encouraging anyone who loves citrus
fruit, to start growing it in your backyard. However, they say it will take four years
to grow the first good fruit. [KENNY]
Meanwhile, replacing a legend is never easy, but that’s the task for Georgia Farm Bureau
after longtime Walton County agent John Redding announced his retirement recently. Redding spent 48 years at the Bureau but did
more than just sell insurance. He also was involved with the Soil and Water
Conservation District and says his future plans include staying active in Farm Bureau
and spending more time on his 500-acre farm. [John Redding – Retiring from GFB Insurance
after 48-Years] I hope that, that when people think back,
excuse me, over my career, they will say..”Well, he was honest. He did what he said he would do. And if he told you something you could depend
on it. [RAY]
The 2018 berry season is in full swing and operations across the state are working hard
to get natures sweet snacks off those trees. [KENNY]
The Monitor’s John Holcomb recently visited Buffalo Creek Berry Farm to talk about their
season and ended up getting to hear a great story of how the farm came to be. [Lexington, GA – John Holcomb, Reporting]
It’s almost picture perfect, or maybe it is. A mom, dad, pulling their daughter around
in a wagon. And just when you think it couldn’t get any
better, how about finding out their story begins half way around the world in the land
down under. [Laura & Cameron Phillips – Buffalo Creek
Berry Farm] After finishing the PhD, I wanted to do something
different, and decided that Australia, it was between Australia and Italy, but I didn’t
know Italian, so I thought I would go to Australia to have a go working there. [John]
While on a plane on the way back to Australia, Laura was told about a man named Cameron that
only lived just a couple of hours from her that also worked on a farm. [Laura]
So, as you might do when you sit next to someone for eight hours, had a good chat, probably
5 hours into it, she starts telling me about a lovely man that’s very much into his health
and wellness and lives on a farm and moved back to help out his parents. [John]
After talking with the lady about Cameron for a while, Laura finally gave in. [Laura]
She said, would you mind if I give him your details and I thought, well, what do I have
to lose, I’m on a plane, ok, that’s alright. So, I gave her my business card, and in a
couple of weeks later, he sent a text. [John]
After talking for a few weeks, they decided to meet over the Christmas Holidays. [Laura]
We had a blast after those ten days or through those ten days, and from then, that’s how
our relationship kind of blossomed. [John]
They decided to get married and start a family, and during a visit to the states to see Laura’s
parents, they decided to make another big decision. [Cameron]
The third time we came to visit for eight weeks and Laura’s dad said, hey, there’s a
great blueberry farm that’s being advertised for three months in a row, let’s go check
it out. So, I was silly enough to say, yes, let’s
go and do that. [John]
They ended up falling in love with it and with the help of Laura’s parents, bought the
farm last August. [Cameron]
This is an existing farm, originally it was founded by Martha and Danial in 2005. It was a pine plantation initially, but they
have transformed it into what it is today, and that is 2,500 blueberries with nine different
varieties, rabbit eye, blueberries. 2,500 blackberries, and seventeen mulberry
trees for folks to choose from. [John]
They have 23 acres of berries planted and are totally a you pick farm with a focus on
family values. [Laura]
For us, we want to really cater to families and people looking to escape the hustle and
bustle. So, we’re not an amusement park, but when
you come out here, you really get to enjoy the sounds of the birds and nature. [John]
They also have a tremendous respect for nature and the earth. They work hard to be very conscientious of
health as well as the environment. [Laura]
For us, it’s important to be stewards of the soil. So, having a healthy gut as a human being
means that transcends to a healthy person. We believe that healthy soil transcends into
a healthy plant and ultimately the food that we eat. So, that’s quite important for us. [John]
Reporting in Lexington for the Farm Monitor, I’m John Holcomb. [KENNY]
WELL HERE’S SOME ENTERTAINMENT FOR YA. WATCHING RAY IN THE KITCHEN. WHEN WE COME BACK, RAY AND MARCIA DIVE INTO
SOME PEACH RECIPES AND HAVE SOME TIPS ON HOW TO PICK OUT THE PERFECT PEACH. [Music]
[Thomas Maddox – Georgia FFA Central Region State V.P]
Hi, my name is Thomas Maddox and I’m serving as one of your central region state Vice Presidents
and I’m from the Veterans FFA Chapter. Probably around 2006 when I was 7-years old,
my Dad started to plant a garden. And so, about every year we planted corn,
tomatoes, squash every year. So, it kind of introduced me to what agriculture
can hold. Um, but throughout the past 7 years it’s just
been focustly, mainly being involved with FFA and competing in many different career
development events and just getting exposed to many opportunities that this organization
holds. [Announcer]
To learn more about the National FFA Organization, log on to ffa.org. [Andrea Scarrow – UGA Extension Program Development
Coordinator] Well, UGA Extension for me is going back to
my grass roots of when I returned to my hometown about in 2005, I connected with my Extension
office and it was actually a county agent there at the Extension office who showed me
all of the wonderful things that Extension has to offer. We’re helping families and individuals on
so many issues that are relevant to making life better. It might be foods and nutrition. It might be teaching a food safety class. It might be helping a community plant a community
garden. It might be helping folks increase their access
to physical activity in a community or it might be helping a family prepare their income
taxes and get back a refund that they would have not otherwise received. This is one of the best jobs in the world. I’ve always described myself as a people helper,
that’s what I’m passionate about and if that’s how you describe yourself, then Extension
is the best job in the world. [Ray D’Alessio]
Well if you’re a regular on the Georgia Farm Monitor then you know that the peach crop
this year is looking very good, and today we’ve got some excellent looking peaches because
today on Meals from The Field, our main topic of discussion, yes, peaches! [Ray D’Alessio and Marcia Crowley]
Speaking of peaches, no, that’s not my nickname for her. Joining us always, my good and dear friend
Marcia Crowley. Good to see you as always Marcia-
[Marcia Crowley] Good to see you, Ray. [Ray D’Alessio]
But no you said this year’s peach crop was looking very, very good. [Marcia Crowley]
I think it’s going to be very good after the past couple of years. So I’d like to start off with the basics,
because I made this mistake the other day. [Ray D’Alessio]
Yeah, let’s talk about when you’re going into a store, what do you want to look for in a
peach? [Marcia Crowley]
You need to look, first of all, it should not feel like a baseball, okay. [Ray D’Alessio]
But I like hard peaches, though, some people like soft peaches. [Marcia Crowley]
Okay, well they’re not going to kill you if you throw it at ’em. It first of all should smell like a peach
and it should have a well-defined crease. [Ray D’Alessio]
Right there, okay. [Marcia Crowley]
Cause I bought some peaches the other day that were labeled Georgia peaches-
[Ray D’Alessio] And we won’t say where they were from. [Marcia Crowley]
And they were not. They were awful. [Ray D’Alessio]
Because they’re not from Georgia. [Marcia Crowley]
Right, okay. [Ray D’Alessio]
So what have we got today? [Marcia Crowley]
The first thing we’re going to do is shrimp peach kabobs, and I’ve been doing peaches
for, demonstrating peaches for 30, 40 years. They’re very versatile, it just gets more
and more difficult to come up with new things for them, so that’s what we’ve tried to do
today. [Ray D’Alessio]
Okay. [Marcia Crowley]
Okay, we’ve got peaches, peppers, red and green peppers and a Vidalia onion already
in here, because we’re going to marinade it. This marinate… marinade is a half a cup
of pineapple juice, and this is soy sauce, honey and sriracha. [Ray D’Alessio]
Sriracha. [Marcia Crowley]
Yes. [Ray D’Alessio]
Gotcha. [Marcia Crowley]
Gotcha, which if, you know, I had somebody ask me, where you find sriracha. It’s in the international aisle of your grocery
store. That’s very versatile too, if you don’t have
any in your pantry, you might want to pick some up, okay. [Marcia Crowley]
We’re just going to mix that up, we’re going to put our shrimp in here with the veggies. And we’re going to pour this marinade over
it and let it marinade for about 30 minutes. And then you’re going to skewer them and grill
’em. [Ray D’Alessio]
Very nice. [Marcia Crowley]
And if you don’t have a skewer, no problem. You can stir fry it, like in a wok or a frying
pan or whatever. [Ray D’Alessio]
Skewers make it so much fun though and you can buy-
[Marcia Crowley] They make it real fun. [Ray D’Alessio]
Actually you got some fancy skewers here but you can actually go to the store, you can
buy those long wooden skewers. [Marcia Crowley]
You can buy the wooden ones you can buy the wooden ones, you can buy-
[Ray D’Alessio] Put those is water, first. I think you taught me that. [Marcia Crowley]
Oh yeah. [Ray D’Alessio]
You want to soak ’em in water first, and I’m actually taking over your job here. [Marcia Crowley]
Go for it. [Ray D’Alessio]
Soak ’em in water first and then you know- [Marcia Crowley]
Skewer them, [Ray D’Alessio]
put all the skewers and vegetables and things on there as well. [Marcia Crowley]
Then to serve that you would, if you could put it on, you know, de-skewer ’em, I don’t
even know if that’s a word. [Ray D’Alessio]
It is right now. [Marcia Crowley]
It is right now. So you can serve ’em like that or put it in
a big bowl and just serve it over rice or whatever. [Ray D’Alessio]
Alright, what’s next? [Marcia Crowley] :
The next thing and I really liked this recipe. It’s a peach black bean salad. [Ray D’Alessio]
Okay. [Marcia Crowley]
Okay, so it’s a 15-ounce can of black beans, drained and rinsed. And for those that don’t know, if you don’t
rinse them, your whole salad is going to take on the color of the black beans. Okay it’s got two cups of Georgia peaches,
and I have treated those so they don’t turn brown, with citrus like, lime juice or lemon
juice. Alright, a quarter of a cup of green pepper,
a quarter of a cup of Vidalia onion. So, we got all kind of Georgia veggies here. One red pepper. A little bit of cilantro. And then the dressing is simply cumin, salt
and a little bit of lime juice. It also has a chopped avocado in it, which
you can leave out. A lot of people don’t like avocados and it
really turns quickly, so I didn’t put it in this, but it is in the finished… Stir that up. [Ray]
You just mix that up. [Marcia Crowley]
This honestly needs to be served fairly quickly. It does not hold up that well, like overnight. So if you’re going to a tail gate or something. Just mix it up before you go. [Ray D’Alessio]
Look how healthy it is for ya too. [Marcia Crowley]
I know healthy, it’s really good, too. [Ray D’Alessio]
You got the finished product over here. Grab that. [Marcia Crowley]
Okay, let me grab this last thing. [Ray D’Alessio]
All right now for the bad stuff. [Marcia Crowley]
I know, you gotta have a dessert when you’re talking about peaches. I’m sorry. You got to. This is a peach pecan upside down cake. [Ray D’Alessio]
All right. [Marcia Crowley]
And this is a nine-inch cake pan, or if you have a square pan, that would work too. I lined it with parchment paper, that makes
it easier when you turn it over for it to come out of the pan. [Ray D’Alessio]
Okay. [Marcia Crowley]
In here I’ve a quarter of a cup of melted butter and brown sugar and I’m not going to
show the viewers how to make a cake mix, because they know how to do that, but you’re going
to layer two Georgia peaches. Don’t use any other state’s peaches, or you
might get caught like I did the other day, they were awful. Layer that in the bottom of the cake pan. Then a cup and a half of chopped Georgia pecans. Then the cake batter which would go on top
of this, which I felt your viewers would know how to do,
[Ray D’Alessio] I think so
[Marcia Crowley] is flour, baking soda, sugar, egg and milk. You whip that up and you just pour it over
the top. [Ray D’Alessio]
Pour it over the top. [Marcia Crowley]
Then bake it obviously. So, then when it’s done, you let it cool and
when you invert it all this good stuff is on top. [Ray D’Alessio]
Okay. [Marcia Crowley]
Okay. [Ray D’Alessio]
We have the finished product here. Look at that. [Marcia Crowley]
It’s more like a coffee cake, you know. You could do it for breakfast even. [Ray D’Alessio]
Like you said, Marcia, you have to have something bad in there, you know what I’m saying. [Marcia Crowley]
You have to have something. [Ray D’Alessio]
Of course most of the recipes on our website, they are good, but yeah! there’s some bad
stuff in there as well. And you can find those recipes by logging
on to farm-monitor.com. Check out the recipe section, everything is
in there in detail for ya. Some really good stuff, dating back five years
now? [Marcia Crowley]
Oh yeah. [Ray D’Alessio]
Five years, so. Anyway, as always Marcia so good to see you,
thank you so much and we shall see you next month. Enjoy. [KENNY]
UP NEXT, RESTORING NEW LIFE TO A ONE TIME THRIVING 4-H CAMP. HEAR ONE MAN’S PASSION AND DEDICATION TOWARDS
THE FULTON COUNTY 4-H GARDEN PROJECT. [Narrator]
Welcome to Graham Farm and Nature Center located in Estillfork, Alabama. This 491-acre farm was in the Graham family
for 81 years. Nita Graham-Head was born on May 9th 1931
in the Paint Rock River Valley in the mountains. During high school she played basketball on
an all-boys team. Her passion for sport and a little encouragement
from the coach caused her to pursue a college degree in physical education. When she was teaching at Murray State she
helped start a tennis program with a $300 budget. Her passion for sport made her push her players
more. [Nita Graham]
I mean everybody had to push themselves. I had, I had to push them because I didn’t
have money either, but we got… we got it done. [Narrator]
On the farm everyone in the family pitched in including Nita. [Nita Graham]
Uhhh, my dad told me oh if I wanted to make a little more money I could raise my own cotton. I hoed cotton, I picked cotton, I sold cotton. Just did everything. [Narrator]
Chores at the farm kept Nita busy. But during breaks she could be found reading
in a tree, doing cartwheels and being active. [Nita Graham]
Well my dad would sit on the porch. He would sit up there and throw the ball and
I caught it. And I threw it back and he caught it and threw
it back and caught it. [Narrator]
Before her passing in 2017 she donated the farm to the Alabama Cooperative Extension
system to be used as a center for environmental education, animal sciences and youth development. Make sure to check out ACES Graham Farm and
Nature Center on Facebook for more information. [KENNY]
FINALLY THIS WEEK, AFTER A DECADE OF SHEER SILENCE, THE ONE-TIME ICONIC CAMP FULTON-TRUITT
4-H CENTER IN COLLEGE PARK IS ALIVE AND WELL AGAIN AND RECEIVING SOME MUCH-DESERVED ATTENTION. [RAY]
IN FACT, FULTON COUNTY EXTENSION’S NYKITA HOWELL CALLED IT A HIDDEN GEM AND THOUGHT
AN EDUCATIONAL GARDEN WOULD BE THE FIRST STEP IN RETURNING THE CENTER TO ITS HAYDAY. ENTER MASTER GARDENER AND EXTENSION VOLUNTEER
ROBERT CHAPPELLE, WHO DESIGNED THE GARDEN AND HAS NOW MADE IT HIS MISSION TO TRANSFORM
THE SITE INTO THE IDEAL OUTDOOR CLASSROOM. [Robert Chappelle – Fulton County Master Gardener
Extension Volunteer] Our goal is to educate, to enlighten people
that the urgency of growing your own food as far as health and nutrition, teaching the
people in the community of nutrition and the different vegetables, peppers, beans, peas,
corn, and they can show them how to enlighten their life being connected to the thing where
it came from and going back to it. There used to be a garden here decades ago. Now they want to bring it back, so we cleaned
it off, or cleared it off, and tilled it up. As you see, it’s growing back again. And lay it out for it to be self-sufficient,
be on a natural basis, conserving water, using the wood chips, using a drip irrigation system
we developed here and something that will stand for a long time in the future for future
generation, future kids and family to remember this. This is Camp Truitt, a community garden. For the family, for the community. We start from the bottom left. We have a 4-H raised bed where the people
can sit down on. We have herbs and stuff growing in them. The 4-H bed represents the 4-H. We have a
4 x 8 raised bed, we have a 4 x 12 raised bed for the kids can do experiment growing
different vegetables, the 4H club… and the community, they can actually reach out and
rent these beds in the future for a year. The price is unknown right now, and the top
will be … The beds on top of the print showing that we’ll have handicap access for raised
beds. It’ll be about three feet off the ground. Kids with wheelchairs or any disability, it’ll
be easier, accessible to work in their garden. And on the middle of the left, we’ll have
a herb garden. We’ll deal with perennial, annual herbs and
teach people about herbs for medicinal purpose, cooking purposes and knowing that different
herbs help get rid of insects. It makes me feel great that I’m connected
to something that as a child raised on a farm in South Carolina, this is what I always wanted
to do. This was my design. This was my goal, to show a kid what you can
do and show the educational benefits in agriculture and show the community and family that…how
you can raise your food and make it fun. That’s one thing, making sure the kids, how
it can be fun. Sometimes it be a little work, a little sweat,
but it’s all good. [RAY]
YEAH, WE CERTAINLY APPRECIATE HIS PASSION. HEY JUST A REMINDER. FOR ALL THE LATEST AG INFO REGARDING FOOD,
GREAT RECIPES AND WHAT’S HAPPENING DOWN ON THE FARM. BE SURE YOU CHECK OUT OUR TWITTER, FACEBOOK
AND PINTEREST PAGES. OF COURSE, YOU WILL STAY INFORMED AND SEE
WHAT’S UP IN THE WORLD OF FARMING AND WITH US AT THE SHOW. [KENNY]
TAKE CARE EVERYBODY. WE WILL SEE YOU NEXT WEEK, RIGHT HERE ON THE
FARM MONITOR. [RAY]
HAVE A GREAT WEEK

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