Renewable Energy Series: Biomass, Wave, And Tidal | Answers With Joe

Renewable Energy Series: Biomass, Wave, And Tidal | Answers With Joe



the invention of fire was one of the biggest turning points in human history the ability to cook led to bigger brains which gave us the ability to use that fire to make weapons and structures and heat our homes it was also the first use of biomass as a fuel source which makes a biomass plant operator the oldest profession in the world actually no that's prostitutes what I'm saying is biomass is the prostitution of renewable energy this video is the second in a three-part series on renewable energy in the first video which I will link right here I talked about hydropower and geothermal and if you're watching this in the future I'll put the third video link up here too so let's talk biomass biomass involves burning or extracting energy from biological sources like plant matter organic waste and yes wood and while burning trees doesn't sound that green it is considered carbon neutral because the carbon in that plant matter was already a part of the carbon cycle whereas if you dig fossil fuels out of the ground that was carbon that was sequestered away for millions of years now being reintroduced into the atmosphere now there are a lot of different types of biomass from incinerators that burn the material the biofuel for transportation the chemical processes that create usable methane and they vary widely in their efficiency and sustainability for example prancin incinerate leftover plant matter from agriculture or lumber industries are just using waste material that would have been thrown away anyway but creating biofuel from corn and sugarcane crops requires a lot of land and produces a lot of carbon emissions one good thing about biomass is it's local all of the material can be harvested from the local area and it doesn't require a lot of transportation to get from one place to another and just like coal it's flexible if you need more power just throw some more biomass in there and there's always more biomass to use I don't want to brag but we're pretty good at producing waste well it's not the greenest energy source it is a plentiful fuel that provides baseload power for local communities and any communities unlike hydro and geothermal which are location specific everybody has biomass that they can use in fact it kind of self scales because the bigger a community is the more waste they're going to produce and then the more energy that we can get from that waste just creating a nice little resources loop now if you live by the ocean you're more than familiar with the rhythmic pattern of waves crashing on the beach over and over again day and night there's a lot of wave energy out there but wave energy is kind of the weak sauce of renewable energy it's a weak sauce because well we're still trying to figure it out much like hydroelectric energy wave energy seems to have a lot of potential especially for coastal cities which some of the biggest cities in the world are coastal cities so the idea is that the surface of the ocean is constantly bobbing and shifting all the time so how can we use that energy to produce renewable electricity I mean it seems like a great idea 71% of the planet is covered by this constantly moving and oscillating ocean harnessing that energy it just seems like a no-brainer except nobody's really figured it out there's been a lot of ideas that have been tested but none of them have actually produced enough to implement on a large scale in fact the most efficient wave energy generators that we have right now would require 25 kilometres of coastline to produce 1 gigawatt of electricity and estimates have placed the total worldwide potential for wave energy at our current technologies at only to terawatt-hours per year everything that comes out of my mouth about wave energy is more depressing than the last one so who knows maybe some genius will come up with a good way to capture wave energy but for now thing in the ocean a much better solution is tidal energy tide goes in tide goes out never miscommunication you can't explain that until it sir you can't not without a third great understanding of the solar systems whatever magic causes the tide to roll in and out tidal energy captures that energy and create electricity out of it entitle energy is not base load energy it is considered intermittent even though it does go in and out constantly throughout the day there are periods between the tides where it's not generating any energy so they call it intermittent but predictable right now there are two types of tidal energy systems tidal barrage and title stream generators tidal barrage systems basically build a dam or bridge over the openings bays and ports where tides rush in twice a day and capture that energy that passes through the structure turning turbines of the title stream generators are basically like wind turbines on the seafloor in areas where moving tide will turn the blades there is however a third option it's never really been put into practice but holds a lot of potential called dynamic tidal power for this we will build enormous 50 kilometer long dams that stick straight out from a coastline forcing the oncoming tide to go through the structure in turn turbines this would work especially well in areas where the tide travels parallel with the coastline such as Southeast Asia and northern Europe there are a few projects in the works to test this out but this would be a massive engineering project the good thing about tidal power is that it happens every single day non-stop and it even works at low speeds they also have very long life spans the first one that was built within Lorenson France in 1966 and it's still working the downside is that it's expensive only works in certain areas and the worldwide potential is only 700 terawatt-hours a year again we consume 21,000 terawatt-hours a year so it's not really going to move the needle but it can serve as a supplementary energy resource to the places that can use it whether that resource is enough to spur investments in those kinds of projects we'll see so I kept us at a pretty high level explanation if you have any personal experience working on tidal projects or biomass that you can add to the discussion I would love to hear more about it in the comments down below and I've also found as I've been researching this that the estimates of the power generation vary widely I got all kinds of different numbers so if you have better sources than I was able to find again please share those downstairs the next video in this series will close out by focusing on the two sexiest renewables one deservedly so and one very much not solar and wind alright thanks for watching this is your first time here I encourage you to check out some of my other videos because I talk about stuff like this all the time and if you like those place absque ribe special thanks to the answer files on patreon that help support this channel if you would like to join them and get some special perks like my patreon only vlog and behind-the-scenes type stuff you can join at patreon.com slash answers with Joe and as always this video sponsored by concur boy comm if you get mouth ulcers or canker sores on a regular basis you can stop them by taking this daily supplement and you can get it at concur boy comm you get a two-month risk-free trial alright thanks again for watching like and share if you liked it now go out there and have an eye-opening week and see you next Monday buddy guys take care

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25 thoughts on “Renewable Energy Series: Biomass, Wave, And Tidal | Answers With Joe

  1. What about Tesla gyms?
    Hook up all the machines to energy storage devices/systems.
    Not sure about the math but every bit helps and all those spin classes would be packed if it meant saving on membership fees.
    Just a random thought. 😉

    P.s. we're having our roof done today and I'm disappointed that we can't afford to use the Tesla solar roofing tiles I read about a while back.
    I live in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Unfortunately, we don't have any good subsidy programs to encourage switching to renewables. Hell, we don't even have any good gov programs for training technicians in the field of renewables.
    Lol…longest "p.s." ever!

  2. We can make biochar, and save as much of the black carbon and put it back in the soil; sinking it out of the air, and vastly improving the soil.

    If we get methane from sewage, then the resulting effluent makes excellent fertilizer – so nothing goes to waste.

    With a small amount of storage, tidal power would be quite viable.

  3. Joe, I have a friend who has patented a bladeless turbine powergen system. In conjunction with Herriot Watt University, Scotland. Originally designed to keep boats eleectrical systems charged, he has now scaled it up. I do not have efficiency figures but, basically, if there is water movement it will produce power. The issue I see is storing the electricity produced and on a large scale it cannot be relied upon to accommodate demand changes. BTW; I am Beelzebub's nephew, having spent my career in the oil and gas industry. Spent a couple of years at Exxon-Mobil HQ in Houston. For my penance, I now spend my time helping those people who have mental health and substance misuse problems as a result of adverse childhood experiences. When robots take all our jobs we will all have to switch to caring for other humans. Something the robots will not be able to do for a long time, if ever.

  4. Wave energy: AMERICA the BIG, a basis of our energy filosofy. Consider how very easy it wud be to make hydrogen with an up/down piston, the elec fully used at its origin. A small pump transfers the hydrogen thru a 3 stage compression, powered, of course, with hydrogen. When the tank is full, an automated 'truck' delivers an empty and pulls away with a full one . Now, times 500 and make it 200 little drop off back of boat piston generators. A lot of littles is big. What is a tractor trailer tank of hydrogen worth. the economy of scale, a rite size.
    Gray

  5. How about large scale farming of Algea? I was expecting you to cover this in detail because I've heard about it sporadically but haven't really heard much about it's real potential or new developments.

  6. kWh, Twh, nix, nox. I know you’re just beating the haters to the punch but don’t be so hard on yourself man, ya don’t suck…well you might but I have to assume that’s in private.

  7. I understand why biomass (specifically non-waste) is classified as renewable because of the carbon cycle. However is it truly renewable? Consider that we have to cut down vegetation just to burn them at faster rate that we can replant and for the newly planted vegetation to absorb the carbon released from incineration.. Looking for some objective answers to this. Thanks

  8. The problem with biomass energy production is that, for the foreseeable future, we need to avoid putting any carbon into the atmosphere. If we can switch from coal, oil and natural gas it would help, in that we wouldn't be adding more carbon, but it seems that there might be better solutions, at least for the short term. If we could augment this with carbon sequestration…

  9. LOL ok so I got 12 seconds in and I hear "fire made mans brains bigger"… WTheck is wrong with people that cant admit that current science is based on someones elitism attitudes based on ones own "theoretical" positions…

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